• Fee: Free Practice Tests (based on CPACC Guide https://www.accessibilityassociation.org/ )
  • Passing score: 95%
  • Time limit: 40 minutes
  • Number of questions: 40
  • Format: Multiple Choice, Multi Answer and True/False
  • Difficulty: Advance
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CPACC Practice Exam - 2

CPACC Practice Exam - 2

1 / 40

What is the Air Carrier Access Act of 1986?

2 / 40

How can you make a site more flexible to use?

3 / 40

What does ICT mean?

4 / 40

How do you design for low physical effort?

5 / 40

What is the Japanese Basic Law for Persons with Disabilities?

6 / 40

What's the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA)?

7 / 40

What's a VPAT?

8 / 40

What is the EN 301 549?

9 / 40

Approximately how many people in the world have some level of hearing loss?

10 / 40

How can you create equitable use cases?

11 / 40

What is The Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities?

A non-legally binding document from the UN that can help governments make policy decisions regarding people with disabilities. It has 22 rules that fit into the following categories, as well as a monitoring mechanism:
1. Preconditions for Equal Participation
2. Target Areas for Equal Participation
3. Implementation Measures

12 / 40

What's the difference between usability and UX?

13 / 40

Around how many people in the world are deafblind?

14 / 40

How can you make a site more simple and intuitive to use?

15 / 40

Which type of colorblindness is the most common?

16 / 40

What is the Ontarians with Disabilities Act?

17 / 40

What are the three types of primary brain networks?

1. Recognition networks - collecting and understanding information and recalling facts
2. Strategic networks - planning, organizing, and connecting
3. Affective networks - giving personal meaning to knowledge

18 / 40

What is the Swedish Discrimination Act of 2009?

19 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "flexibility in use" and what are some examples of it?

20 / 40

What are the 7 principles of universal design?

1. equitable use
2. flexibility in use
3. simple and intuitive use
4. perceptible information
5. tolerance for error
6. low physical effort
7. size and space for approach and use

21 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "low physical effort" and what are some examples of it?

A person should be able to use the product or navigate the environment comfortably without getting unnecessarily tired.

- drinking fountains, doors, and toilets that have automatic sensors
- kitchen utensils that are easy to hold and use
- touch lamps

22 / 40

How do you design for size and space?

23 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "simple and intuitive use" and what are some examples of it?

The purpose of the product or environment's features should be easy to understand - a person who doesn't speak the language or who has a cognitive disability should still be able to use it.

- standardized signs, symbols, and icons
- printed materials that have both text and images
- control panels that don't have extra buttons

24 / 40

What is the UK Equality Act of 2010?

25 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "tolerance for error" and what are some examples of it?

The design should lower the chances of an error or accident happening.

- touchscreens and buttons should be large
- appliances that could be dangerous and screens that include private information should shut off or log out after a specific amount of time (preferably with the option to extend the time period)

26 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "equitable use" and what are some examples of it?

The design of the product or environment should be useful and marketable to everyone - if it can't be equal it should be equivalent.

- having the same entrance for everyone
- sidewalks with curb cuts
- elevators in buildings with multiple floors

27 / 40

What are ICT options for people with mobility disabilities?

28 / 40

What does AAC mean?

29 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "size and space for approach and use" and what are some examples of it?

Space should be provided in the design so that it allows anyone to use the design features regardless of physical build or physical abilities.

- bathrooms with space for walkers and wheelchairs
- turnstiles and gates in public places that are large enough for people with mobility issues
- wide aisles, hallways, and doorways

30 / 40

What are ICT options for people who are deafblind?

31 / 40

What are ICT options for people with cognitive disabilities?

32 / 40

Approximately how many people in the world have low vision?

33 / 40

What is the UK Civil Aviation Authority?

An advisory board founded in 1972 that oversees regulating aviation in the UK. The group has a goal of providing support and equal opportunities to fly for every passenger regardless of ability.

34 / 40

How can you add information to your site or product in a way that's perceivable?

35 / 40

What is the ADA?

36 / 40

What are ways to increase tolerance for error on a site?

37 / 40

What is Section 508?

38 / 40

What is the ADA Title I?

It prohibits private companies, state and local governments, staffing companies, and labor unions from discriminating against people with disabilities during an application process, while working, or after they've been employed.

 

39 / 40

Approximately how many people in the world are blind?

40 / 40

What is the Universal Design principle "perceptible information" and what are some examples of it?

A person's sensory abilities should not hinder them from receiving information.

- Braille next to printed text on signs and buttons
- Visual and audio feedback at transportation stations and on elevators
- Doorbells that have lights or vibrating options instead of only sound

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